Peanut Allergy Awareness Day

The Wolves host their second Peanut Allergy Awareness Day of the 2013-14 season on Sunday, March 23, at 3 p.m. when the team faces Grand Rapids. Section 116 will be powerwashed and designated as a reserved area for all Peanut Allergy Awareness Day guests. 

In addition, the arena will not serve any peanuts or peanut-related food items. For fans who purchase tickets through this offer, Enjoy Life Foods will provide a product sample goodie bag. A portion of the proceeds generated will go to support FARE.

 Four Easy Ways To Purchase Peanut Free Seating:

01Call Wolves Account Executive Janel James at (847) 832-1982

02Submit an online request using the form below and a Wolves representative will assist you.

03Fax your completed order form to: (847) 724-1652 ATTN: Peanut Allergy Awareness

04 Mail in your completed order form to: Chicago Wolves, ATTN: Peanut Allergy Awareness, 2301 Ravine Way, Glenview, IL 60025

Get Involved!

Ever wonder how YOU could be a part of the fun activities during a Wolves game like shooting the puck on the ice or winning great prizes by answering trivia? The Wolves are looking for fans who might have the chance to get involved in the fun! Fill out the form below and submit it three days prior to the game you're attending.

Name: (*)

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Seat Location: (*)

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Daytime Phone: (*)

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Email: (*)

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Are you a season ticket holder? (*)

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FACTS ABOUT FOOD ALLERGIES

food-allergy-infographicClick to enlarge

Over the past 10 years, the incidence of food allergies has been increasing in developed countries worldwide. In the U.S., some 12 million people suffer from food allergies of varying degrees of severity—nearly 4% of children under age 18 and 3-4% of the overall population. There is no cure and no therapy to prevent anaphylaxis, a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction—only emergency treatment to control a reaction that is already in progress.

Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis

  • For some people, even a tiny trace of the wrong food can trigger an anaphylactic reaction. People with food allergies must always be vigilant. Dangerous trace amounts of problem foods may be found in poorly labeled processed foods, on cross-contaminated utensils or manufacturing equipment—even carried on another person's hands or transmitted through a kiss.
  • The foods that most commonly cause anaphylaxis are peanuts, tree nuts, and shellfish.
  • Every year, food-allergic reactions account for some 203,000 emergency room visits—sending someone to the ER every three minutes.

Who Gets Food Allergies

  • More than 6.5 million Americans are allergic to seafood and more than 3 million are allergic to peanuts and tree nuts.
  • The number of children with peanut and tree nut allergies tripled from 1997-2008. Teens and young adults with these allergies appear to be at an increased risk for severe allergic reactions.

[Source: www.faiusa.org]



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